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Sunday, July 1, 2018

2018 The Bitter End (a Tea)

2018 The Bitter End beeng, and loose leaf high grade

This year our weather morphed from winter into hot summer within four weeks. I took this photo in mid-April before shoveling out of this snowstorm.


I took this photo on date April 18, 2018. 
Now we are sweltering in hot temps more akin to southeast Asia than close to Canada. The past two days the temps soared to over 100F (up to 43C) and dewpoints close to 80, giving my tea welcome Hong Kong-like storage conditions. While my tea is very happy, I am not so happy. My window AC units really cannot cope well with these high temps, the air is stagnant and barely tolerable as long as I do not move.

Everything hurts, I ache. I used to be an agile person, what happened to all that? I cannot stand to drink hot tea, much less write about it and I refuse to write about tea I am not drinking. Instead, I buy bags of ice and chug cold drinks all day long, when I am not sleeping that is. Wake me up come September. We lost a few degrees in what the weather people are calling a “cool off” which is short for “not much change.” I thought “I need to drink some tea and talk to myself on the blog.”

I recently purchased Bitterleaf Tea’s aptly named 2018 Bitter End, reportedly a Laoman-e 200g pressing selling for $77. Along with this, Bitterleaf offers baggies of “better” tea from the same farm, for over $1/g, or $11.50 for a 10g bag. I bought two of these baggies because one is not enough. This is a great opportunity to try two different quality grades of tea from the same farm. Laoman-e is tough to find nowadays, given this area is right next door to Lao Bhang Zhang and often substituted for LBZ in the past.


This is a close up of the loose leaf higher grade from the bags.
Laoman-e is known for bitterness along with the neighboring Bulang area. I like my teas bitter when young, so hit me dad. The teas arrived smelling slightly vine-y because they are just two months old. In fact, the tea was picked on the same days I had the above snowstorm. I gave the teas a two week rest in part for the tea, and in part because it’s too hot to drink tea most days. So, what is the real difference between these two teas?


The date on the wrapper is backwards, but it is dated April 18,
picked the same day as that crazy snowstorm photo above.
The cake consists of younger cultivated tea leaves, and brews up with a lovely floral scent, but don’t be fooled, the bitterness awaits me. Right now the tea looks green and under boiling water gets quite bitter from steeps 3-6. The cake is very, very clean, not a hint of smoke or charring. I expect the tea to thicken up during aging rather than when young.


This is a 200g beeng.
The bitterness lightens up after six steepings, so now the tea gives perhaps 8-10 decent strength brews, and may eventually produce more as it tightens up over time. The leaves appear a bit stewed at this point, although some of the leaves do not crumble when rubbed between the fingers. It’s a decent tea, and the price point seems right.


The brew is still fairly green, normal for a recent pressing.
The “better” Laoman-e sample is in loose form, and of course the leaves are lovely. Here is the main difference, the “better” tea adheres to the picking standard of 1 bud/2 leaves and I see more buds. The brew is stronger by far, tongue-punishing bitterness that lingers in the mouth for a good hour afterward. 


Brewed leaves from the beeng, I used a hefty amount.
Three cups of this is plenty to convince me that this is the better tea. The color and viscosity are the same with both teas at this stage, but one is a mild bitter hurt and the other is bitter pain.


Brewing of the higher grade loose leaf,
the color and viscosity are virtually identical.
But the loose leaf is quite strong.
For me, the main reason I carted these teas is for the opportunity they offer to try two different quality grades from the same tea farm. A few years ago, white2tea offered a similar comparison from the Mengsong area. Back then I found this comparison informative and fun. Not only am I able to refine my palate in tasting differences between tea grades, I gain more insight into how tea buyers taste teas. Even if I had my youthful agility back, a trip to Yunnan for this same experience would cost me thousands of dollars. Instead, I can get this experience at home for less than $100.


Here is the loose leaf, I used a lot less and
got punished harder. You can see the 1 bud/2 leaf, and
some double buds.
I feel a bit of hope with this offering from Bitterleaf , seeing a doorway for me contending with high prices for puerh. Maybe vendors will continue to offer a reasonably priced tea like the beeng here, and then also sell samples of better quality from the same farm. In addition, Bitterleaf sells a huangpian brick from this farm too for a reasonable $28. This is quite a nice line-up of options for the wallet. I can store away the affordable beeng, and yet still enjoy a bit of good tea too from the sample.

Bitterleaf states on the listing for the higher quality tea that they could consider doing a larger buy if enough people are interested in a purchase. I am guessing the offer may consist of a 100g pressing. In any case, I see the dilemma of the professional tea buyer, which is just like our own as amateur buyers, the uncertainty of whether to really spend for that high grade leaf.

4 comments:

  1. Cwyn N,

    Hahaha… Yes! When I saw this recent release from Bitterleaf I was hoping you would review it. It has “Death By Tea” literally written all over it… hahaha.

    Think you have a certain affinity towards the skull:

    https://deathbytea.blogspot.com/2016/07/2016-head-and-teadontlie-white2tea.html

    As always you present many points in one review which I love reading. I was just hoping for more than just “bitter, more bitter, and floral”.

    How about the qi, mouthfeel, body feeling, throat feeling, aftertastes? What else in here could convince us to buy or not buy these bitter beauties?

    Peace

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    Replies
    1. I like to focus my reviews on the positives. At $.38/g one is not going to find much qi, mouthfeel, body feel or throat feel. I did mention the tea is thin which is common when new, and should thicken with age. As for the $1+/g tea, I believe I mentioned the picking standard, stronger bitter aftertaste. My blog history shows quite well that if a tea has any other after effects, I am sure to mention them.

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    2. And, as far as convincing others to buy a tea, that's the last thing I would want to do. If I like a tea, I'd rather nobody else buy it and leave it all for me. Secondly, people vary in their tastes and I have seen inexperienced people buy teas blind from a blog review and hate them. At these prices, people need more experience than a mere blog post to decide for themselves,

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  2. Cwyn N,

    Thanks for your honesty, I always appreciate it.

    Was considering a buy of this when it came out- with the 2 samples you also reach the threshold for free shipping.

    Would like to try Bitterleaf one of these days.

    Much Peace

    ReplyDelete